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1 Month Blog

As the saying goes, time flies when you’re having fun. 1 month has passed since I joined the Naz Legacy Foundation and believe me, the time has flown by. Keeping track of time and savouring memories is one of the reasons as to why I’ve decided to write this blog. Recording how my first month with the foundation has gone, may be an interesting read 12 months down the line when I am able to look back on how much I’ve grown within that time period.

First and foremost, I must confess that before starting my role as Programmes Coordinator, I was not sure exactly what my day to day routine would look like. One month on, I’m pleased to say that I now have a much better understanding of how my role fits into the bigger picture. Without a doubt, the highlight of my first month was our event at the Tower of London which celebrated COVID heroes from across different religious groups. Seeing all of our hard work when preparing for the event, pay off, gave me a real sense of achievement. The event went well and it was an honour to be part of it. Hearing speeches from some fantastic people really confirmed what I already knew, that I was part of an organization that stood for the same values as my own.

Although the event at the Tower was a great success, the evening challenged me to come out of my comfort zone by taking the lead in organising our volunteers. Telling a large group of people, who you’ve only just met, what to do and how can sometimes be a daunting task. To be honest, at first, it did seem daunting. My briefing could have been better, but I know it’s something I can improve and work on. Hopefully, when reading back on this blog in 12 months time, I will have mastered briefings by then.

Here’s to another 11 months, possibly longer, of months like my first. Full of learning, interesting events, and meeting more inspirational people.

By Clement Koszuta

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